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Leaving the Tribe

by Luann Udell on 3/26/2010 3:32:43 PM

This post is by guest author, Luann Udell.  This article has been edited and published with the author's permission. You should submit an article and share your views as a guest author by clicking here.


Your needs and goals as an artist will change and grow throughout your life. You will constantly gather the people you need to you.

And you will also periodically leave people behind.


I started this mini-series with a sort of Ugly Duckling story, as one reader noted. I told how my dog tries to be a cat, and why it’s a good thing he isn’t very good at it. When we find out we aren’t really “bad bankers” but are actually “really excellent artists”, it’s an amazing epiphany.

The second article talks about how to find your own tribe.

Interestingly, some people took that to mean searching out other artists who work in the same medium. Some took it as how some artists learn techniques from a master, then never really develop their own style.

Some even found their new “family”, but grieved when it, too, became contentious, confining and restrictive.

While some of us will be fortunate to find a wonderful, cohesive, supportive group of like-minded folks, others will struggle to maintain that in their lives.

Sad to say, but it happens.

The day may come when you have to leave your bright new tribe, and find another.

There are lots of reasons why this happens.

Sometimes the group is just too big. There’s no time for each person to have a turn to be listened to. You can feel lost in the shuffle.

Sometimes there aren’t enough “rules”. A few folks will take on the role of gadfly (aka “jerk”). Or there are too many rules, too much “business”. The lively group dynamic is strangled with too many procedural stops and starts. (I left one craft guild when the business reports began to take up almost half the meetings.)

Sometimes the group narrows its own dynamic. It can be subtle but powerful. You’ll start to feel constricted. Here’s a true story:

Years ago, a quilting guild I belonged to brought in a nationally-known color expert for a workshop.

During it, she commented that there were definite regional color palettes, patterns and technique preferences across the country.

I asked her how that happened. She said when members brought in their projects for sharing, some would generate a huge positive response from the membership. Others, more eclectic or “out there”, would receive a lukewarm reception. “We all crave that positive response”, she said. “It’s human nature. So slowly but surely, we begin to tailor our work to generate the bigger response.”

It hit me like a brick. Another quilter and I did more unusual fabric work. The response to our “shares” was decidedly in the “lukewarm” category.

And I had begun to do more work in the “accepted style” of the group.

I left after the workshop, and never went back. My fellow fiber artists were a great bunch of people. But I was not willing to “tamp down” my vision in order to garner their praise.

Sometimes, our course changes. We find ourselves in pursuit of different goals. Or we find our own needs sublimated to the needs of the group.

Or we simply grow faster than the rest of the group. You may even outgrow your mentor. If our work fosters jealousy–if our work becomes more successful, attracts more notice–then professional jealousy might raise its ugly head.

It can feel even harder to leave this new tribe that gave us so much joy at first. In fact, it’s brutal.

But it has to be done, if you want your art to move forward.

You cannot control the feelings of others. You can make yourself, and your work, as small and mundane as you can. But if someone is determined to nibble you, nothing can stop them.

Take heart in this knowledge:

This group served your needs for awhile. Enough for you to gain confidence, and to take a step forward.

And you will find another tribe. It may take awhile. But your peers are out there.

Consider that they may not even be working in the same medium. They may not even be visual artists. They may not be “artists” at all.

As long as they share the same values, or can support and challenge you in constructive ways, you can benefit from their company.

It may even be time for you to walk alone. Just for awhile.

Just long enough to really hear what your own heart is saying.



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 3 Comments

Charlotte Herczfeld
via fineartviews.com
Luann, thank you for a powerful article. Yes, sometimes it is necessary to move on. It can be awfully hard, and highly necessary. I found this article just as I was struggling with such a thought. One's real friends will still be friends, and cheer one on, and keep in contact.

Victoria Beckner
via fineartviews.com
Luann,
I really connected to this piece. Recently, my former best friend, with whom I had not had contact with in 20 years found me on Facebook. Mind you, my name has changed; my spouse has changed; my state is even different; but find me she did!
I was not able to re-connect. I did not want to go back to that "tribe". And I felt that the "tribe" was not going to help me grow, instead it would tie me to a past I had long ago relinquished. It is not so much about art as it is personal movement in a different direction. For me, a "tribe" works so long as it is mutually reinforcing of positive actions. I like my new "tribe" so much that I can't imagine being a member of the old one.

Phyllis OShields Fine Art
via fineartviews.com
very interesting article, moving on is part of our journey in life, a necessary part of growing, experiencing new ideas and stretching, I guess having the grace in doing so is knowing and recognizing when it is time.. thanks Phyllis OShields










 

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