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Using Freedom Wisely

by Lori Woodward Simons on 9/22/2009 9:39:35 AM

Today's Post is by Lori Woodward Simons, Regular contributing writer for FineArtViews.

Why is it that I don't have to put effort into establishing bad habits while gearing up for good habits takes every ounce of self-control I can muster up?

Balancing Freedom with Flexibility


As an artist, I have a maximum of freedom and flexibility with my time, and this is one of the things that makes being a professional artist a joy, but at the same time it creates a war within me. The daily struggle to choose the right thing to do for the advancement of my artwork is ever present. If I am to succeed and produce lots of incredible artwork – thereby making a living at it, I'm going to need a great deal of self-discipline in order to overcome my natural inclination to treat my life as a vacation.

Practicing Self-Motivation


When I worked for someone else, I didn't need much self discipline because someone else was arranging my schedule and tasks. Either I did what I was supposed to do or I'd get fired. As an artist, I mistakenly believe the lie that I can goof off and yet succeed. Nothing is further from the truth. Even though wasting time doesn't seem to cause me immediate pain, the truth is I am headed for disaster. Furthermore, because I have a spouse who makes the bulk of the household income, there isn't even the incentive to feed myself or pay bills.

I believe that in order to establish good working habits, the reality of failure needs to feel real and imminent. I need to scare myself into a regimented schedule – just as though I were working for someone else and believe that there are consequences when I don't take my work time seriously.

In order to scare myself with the facts, I make a list or imagine what will happen in the near future if I fail to practice good work habits. The first and most obvious result is that I will lose self-confidence as I delay my working at the easel. Secondly, I will lack having enough paintings ready for opportunities that crop up – and they do crop up when I least expect it! Most importantly, not having paintings means that they will not exist for folks to buy and enjoy for a lifetime. I must not lose sight of how my artwork brings beauty and moments of joy into the lives of others.

One Routine Does Not Fit All

Succeeding as an artist is such a complex pursuit – I can hardly even touch on what it takes in the context of one blog. We are individuals and have unique challenges. Folks who are not artists may think we have an easy life. I admit that running a business as a professional artist has been my biggest career challenge. Even so, I would not chose any other career... it truly is a labor of love, and will stay that way if I indeed establish and practice good working habits.

“EACH DAY I MUST DO SOMETHING, NO MATTER HOW SMALL, TO MOVE AHEAD WITH MY ART”. That means painting even when it's not going well. It means hanging in there and resolving difficult problems, starting a painting over, setting time aside to study and copy old masters, wasting paint with practicing, and ultimately becoming my personal best.

 

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Related Posts:

Twin Pillars of Art Marketing Success

A Time to Play

Believing in What You Do

Finding Your True Motivation

Staying Ahead of the Pack

Exercise Builds Creative Muscles

A Healthy Balance

Keep on Keeping On




What Would You Like to Do Next?
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 3 Comments

Dianne Poinski
via fineartviews.com
Thank you! You said everything I have been thinking! It can be so frustrating to have so many ideas and thoughts but no one to tell you which direction to go. I love my freedom but sometimes I wish someone would pop up and tell me what to do next. Oh well, as long as I show up each day and like you said - do something every day - I will move ahead, even if it's slowly.
Thanks again!


Sharon Marston
via fineartviews.com
Human nature is such a funny and frustrating thing. We help ourselves into a state of unproductive bliss on a daily basis! I think Lori hit the nail on the head about the war that happens within us all. We know that something must be done, we want to succeed and make great art, but the key is getting motivation to meet up with concentration and discipline. It does take quite an effort to pull them all together and focus them in the direction you want your art to travel. We have no roadmap set out in front of us, we have to draw our own every single day if we want to get somewhere. Being a full time artist is awesome, but I totally agree that it is the hardest job I have ever done,... and it is definitely the most rewarding job I have ever had! Thanks for your insight Lori!

Lori Woodward Simons
via clintwatson.net
Well said, Sharon about having no roadmap. It's up to us to design our own map and stay the course.

Dianne, It seems that creative minds generate more than they can do... part of being an artist, I guess. It's nice to know that I'm not the only one out there that thinks this way.











 

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