Artist Websites  Artist Websites |  Featured Artists |  Art Marketing  Art Marketing |  Art Contest |  BrushBuzz |  InformedCollector |  FASO Loves You - Share Your Art, Share Life

Blog


« Art Doesnít End At The Edge Of The Canvas | Main | The Life of Art, Series #31 »


Follow this Blog



Subscribe to our Newsletter



Quick Links

Artist Websites and Good Design
How to Sell Art
How to Get Your Art Noticed by Galleries
SEO For Artists - The Ultimate Tip

 

Blog Roll

Mikki Senkarik's Blog

















acrylic painting
advice for artists
analytics
art and culture
art and psychology
art and society
art appreciation
art blogging advice
Art Business
art collectors
art criticism
art education
art fairs
art festivals
art forum
art gallery tips
art history
art law
art marketing
art museums
art reception
art show
art studio
art supplies
art websites
artist resume advice
artist statement
Artwork videos
BoldBrush Winners
Brian Sherwin
Carolyn Edlund
Carolyn Henderson
Carrie Turner
Clint Watson
commissioned art
copyright
Cory Huff
creativity
Curator's Pick
Daily Art Show
Dave Geada
Dave Nevue
email newsletters
Eric Rhoads
exhibits
exposure tips
Facebook
FASO
FASO Featured Artists
Fine Art Shows
FineArtViews
framing art
Gayle Faucette Wisbon
giclee prints
Google
Guest Posts
Holiday
InformedCollector
inspiration
Instagram
Instruction
Internet Scams
Jack White
Jane Hunt
Jason Horejs
Jen Piche
John Weiss
Juried Shows
Kathleen Dunphy
Keith Bond
Kelley Sanford
Kim VanDerHoek
landscape painting
Lori Woodward
Luann Udell
Mark Edward Adams
mixed media
Moshe Mikanovsky
New FASO Artist Members
News
Noteworthy Artist
oil painting
online art competitions
online art groups
open studio
originality
painting
pastel
photography
Pinterest
plein air painting
portraits
press releases
pricing artwork
printmaking
realism
S.C. Mummert
sculpture
sell art
selling art online
selling fine art online
SEO for Artist Websites
social media
social networking
solo show
SSL
Steve Atkinson
still life art
support local art
Think Tank
Twitter
watercolor
websites for artists
workshops
Zac Elletson




 Feb 2018
Jan 2018
Dec 2017
Nov 2017
Oct 2017
Sep 2017
Aug 2017
July 2017
June 2017
May 2017
Apr 2017
Mar 2017
Feb 2017
Jan 2017
Dec 2016
Nov 2016
Oct 2016
Sep 2016
Aug 2016
July 2016
June 2016
May 2016
Apr 2016
Mar 2016
Feb 2016
Jan 2016
Dec 2015
Nov 2015
Oct 2015
Sep 2015
Aug 2015
July 2015
June 2015
May 2015
Apr 2015
Mar 2015
Feb 2015
Jan 2015
Dec 2014
Nov 2014
Oct 2014
Sep 2014
Aug 2014
July 2014
June 2014
May 2014
Apr 2014
Mar 2014
Feb 2014
Jan 2014
Dec 2013
Nov 2013
Oct 2013
Sep 2013
Aug 2013
July 2013
June 2013
May 2013
Apr 2013
Mar 2013
Feb 2013
Jan 2013
Dec 2012
Nov 2012
Oct 2012
Sep 2012
Aug 2012
July 2012
June 2012
May 2012
Apr 2012
Mar 2012
Feb 2012
Jan 2012
Dec 2011
Nov 2011
Oct 2011
Sep 2011
Aug 2011
July 2011
June 2011
May 2011
Apr 2011
Mar 2011
Feb 2011
Jan 2011
Dec 2010
Nov 2010
Oct 2010
Sep 2010
Aug 2010
July 2010
June 2010
May 2010
Apr 2010
Mar 2010
Feb 2010
Jan 2010
Dec 2009
Nov 2009
Oct 2009
Sep 2009
Aug 2009
July 2009
June 2009
May 2009
Apr 2009
Mar 2009
Feb 2009
Jan 2009
Dec 2008
Nov 2008
Oct 2008
Sep 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
Apr 2008
Mar 2008
Feb 2008
Jan 2008
Dec 2007
Nov 2007
Oct 2007
Sep 2007
Aug 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
Apr 2007
Mar 2007
Feb 2007
Jan 2007
Dec 2006
Nov 2006
Oct 2006
Sep 2006
Aug 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
Apr 2006
Mar 2006
Feb 2006
Jan 2006
Dec 2005
Nov 2005
Sep 2005
Aug 2005

 

THIN SECRETS FOR BEING SUCCESSFUL: A Series of Small Strategies to Help You Get Big(ger)(ish)

by Luann Udell on 2/3/2018 5:25:59 AM

This post is by Luann Udell, regular contributing author for FineArtViews. She's blogged since 2002 about the business side--and the spiritual inside--of art. She says, "I share my experiences so you won't have to make ALL the same mistakes I did...."  For ten years, Luann also wrote a column ("Craft Matters") for The Crafts Report magazine (a monthly business resource for the crafts professional) where she explored the funnier side of her life in craft. She's a double-juried member of the prestigious League of New Hampshire Craftsmen (fiber & art jewelry). Her work has appeared in books, magazines and newspapers across the country and she is a published writer.

 

 

 

 

(Spoiler alert: The choices are small, but many. And you have to keep at it!)

 

Years ago, I sat on a panel of artists and crafts industry professionals, speaking on various issues and answering questions from the audience.

 

Near the end, an artist badgered me unmercifully, repeatedly asking me to reveal my marketing "secrets" for the entire audience to hear.

 

I felt extremely uncomfortable, even resentful, about the demands for several reasons.

 

First, I wasn't even sure what was being asked. A list of all my marketing efforts for the past 18 months to promote my artwork? For the last 8 years? The efforts before or after 9/11, the dot com crash and the recession? Did they want to hear all my mistakes, too? Or just my successes? Did they want to hear what I learned? Or what I'm learning now?

 

How much time do you have?!

 

I was also frustrated because I had no context for the person asking the questions. I had no idea what their work is like, where they are now in their business plan (or if they even HAVE a business plan) and what they are willing to do to succeed. I had no idea what their personal, financial and professional goals are for their art/business. I had no idea who their market is and what they've done to target it or even identify it. How do I know what will be of use to someone else unless I understandwhere they’ve been, where they are now, and where they want to go?

 

Finally, I was confused by the assumption that I've figured it all out and can neatly box it up and simply give it to someone else. I'm still learning, changing, growing as an artist. I have no idea if I'm even thinking the right way about MY marketing plan. How on earth do I put all this in context for THEM?

 

But I also felt vaguely guilty. After all, wasn't the panel discussion a culmination of an entire weekend doing just that?--helping others take their next step by sharing my own experiences and learning? Hadn't I already mentored a number of people here, and at previous conferences, offering insights and advice freely? Don't I do that daily with my blog, in my magazine articles, and in other professional development classes I teach?

 

So why was I feeling intense resistance to this artist's demands?

 

I'm been thinking about why these scenarios seemed so vastly different, why I would respond wholeheartedly in one instance and clam up in another.

 

The next day, as I ate breakfast, I read an article about long-term weight loss in the April 2006 issue of REAL SIMPLE magazine. The article is called "Secrets of Thin People" by Lorie Parch. And I had my "aha" moment.

 

The person was asking me for my "secret diet" for losing weight.

 

And I don't HAVE a secret diet for losing weight.

 

What I DO have is results from deciding from time to time that I needed to change the daily choices I make in my diet, my activities and my attitude--to achieve a different outcome in my life.

 

What I feel comfortable sharing is how I got from a person who constantly made unhealthy choices, to a person who (periodically) will make consistent, healthier choices--which, as a consequence, RESULTS in me being thinner. (Er…now and then.)

 

I still don't actually diet nor are all my choices perfect even now. But I've been successful in MODIFYING many of my choices slightly over a long period of time. And when I make those modifications, the side effects are, I lose weight, I get more fit, I lower my blood sugar and cholesterol to within healthy limits, and I walk/talk/carry myself, and care for myself, differently.

 

(The ONLY physical “shortcut” I've taken through the years is, brilliant red hair. Better living through chemicals and all that.)

 

I’ll share some of the professional, artistic and emotional changes I made years ago that got me where I am today professionally(with apologies to Ms. Parch for using her article for the structure.)

 

But for today, rest assured there are no "secrets", no insider information that is being systematically withheld from you.

 

I know it feels like that sometimes.... It feels like other people KNOW what to do and when to do it.

 

But that's not the case.

 

Success in the arts, like any other success in life, means staying the course. Staying with one course of action until it has a chance to provide results.

  

One thing that helps you achieve success is getting better at what you do. ​

 

But also recognizing when to switch because it isn't working for YOU.

 

It means making daily choices, often small choices, that eventually…EVENTUALLY lead to big results.

 

Because, just like losing weight is an END RESULT of making many different, healthier life choices, being successful is an END RESULT of making many different, "healthier" artistic, professional and personal choices.

 

 

-------------------------------------------------------

 

Editor's Note:
If you want to start marketing your art, a professional and secure website can be your most valuable tool. And FASO is the easiest way to build and maintain a gorgeous website, we also include amazing marketing tools that automate many common marketing tasks for you. To sign up for a free, no obligation 30 day trial, click here.

 


 

Services:
FASO: The Leading Provider of Professional Artist Websites.
FineArtViews: Straight talk about art marketing, inspiration - daily to your inbox.

InformedCollector: Free daily briefs about today's finest artists in your inbox.

BoldBrush Contest: Monthly Online Painting Contest with over $25,000 in awards. 

Daily Art Show: Daily Show of Art that reaches thousands of potential collectors.

 



Related Posts:

GETTING YOUR STORY OUT THERE: Read All About It!

FLIP A COIN: How to Make Your New Year's Resolution Actually Work for You

THIS IS MY STORY And Iím Sticking to It!

SELLING YOUR WORK: Whatís the Best Way to Sell?


Topics: advice for artists | Art Business | art marketing | FineArtViews | Luann Udell 

What Would You Like to Do Next?
Post your comment Join Email List Follow via RSS Share Share

 

Loading comments...






 

FASO Resources and Articles

Art Scammers and Art Scam Searchable Database

 

FineArtViews, FineArtStudioOnline, FASO, BrushBuzz, InformedCollector, BoldBrush
are Trademarks of BoldBrush Technology, LLC Licensed to BoldBrush, Inc. 

Canvoo is a registered trademark of BoldBrush Technology, LLC Licensed to BoldBrush, Inc

Copyright - BoldBrush Technology, LLC  - All Rights Reserved